Traffic data is a great way to take the temperature of your website and marketing initiatives. When you are writing and promoting blog content on a regular basis, you can use this information to track results and correlate these efforts to actual ROI. Be sure to look at traffic numbers over long-term intervals to see trends and report on improvement over time.
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Moreover, this model is less effective than it was in 2013 because organic Facebook reach is lower than it was.  That’s not to say you can’t drive serious traffic from Facebook posts, Tweets, Pins, etc.  Some publishers still focus on this as their primary source of traffic.  While I do plenty of social media posting, it’s my 3rd favorite source of traffic (behind paid and organic search).

How Do You Optimize Organic Search


Organic traffic is what most marketers strive to increase. This traffic is defined as visitors coming from a search engine, such as Google or Bing. One thing to note is that paid search ads are not counted in this category. In blogkeep and Google Analytics, paid search traffic or PPC is marked in a separate category. Organic search traffic is labeled in green on the sources graph in Blogkeep and can give additional data into the actual search phrase that brought in your traffic. When looking at your analytics tool, you may see traffic labeled as “unknown” or “SSL”. This means that the search terms are being withheld from the data set. This is a result of Google not sharing this information, rather than the analytics platform you are using.
On the other hand, inorganic search rankings refer to high placements that a website pays for. In a nutshell, a website gives the search engine money in exchange for a higher spot on the list. You will often hear this referred to as SEM or PPC (Search Engine Marketing or Pay Per Click) Often, inorganic rankings aren’t directly paid for but bid on in a keyword auction.

For Adwords we use Adwords Scripts – http://searchengineland.com/adwords-bidding-thats-4-times-responsive-google-marin-kenshoo-207877. We also optimize bids in bulk. We have setup event tracking, where in if the user is clicking on an add, we call it and event and then we record it as a transaction or a conversion in analytics. Based on that analytics data we go ahead and optimize bids. Again we dont look at the avg position. We have seen good EPC’s even in the 4-5 position on adwords.
Note: Google made a change a few years ago to how they track keywords and it has had a big impact on the discovery process. Before the change, Google would show which keywords consumers were using to find your website, making it easy to understand where and how your website was ranking. Google changed their tracking system so that any users who are logged into a Google account while searching will no longer have their keywords tracked as their Google activity remains encrypted. Due to this, when looking at Organic Traffic reports you will see (not provided) as a keyword throughout the reports – this often makes up over 90% of organic traffic and requires us to dig a bit more creatively to find what we need.

What Is Paid Traffic Vs Organic Traffic

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