To give you an idea of just how much money is being spent on paid search, take a look at Google. Google's AdWords program is the most used pay-per-click (PPC) advertising program available today. While the tech giant owns YouTube and Android, among hundreds of other profitable brands, AdWords accounts for roughly 70% of their revenue -- which speaks wonders for its effectiveness.

Organic traffic deals directly with SEO. The better you are ranking for competitive keywords, the more organic traffic will result. Websites that blog consistently will see a steady increase in organic search traffic and improved positioning in the search results. As a marketer, it is important to look at your keywords and identify new ranking opportunities each month. These should guide your blogging efforts.

I was traveling when I published that post so I totally forgot to write a unique title and description tag for that post. And because of that, my result on Google looked like this. Not pretty. As you can see, my title tag was cut off and my description tag made absolutely no sense. As you might expect, my click through rate was pretty terrible. Well here's the exact three step process that I used to turn things around. Step one, find Adwords ads. Step two, include words and phrases from Adwords ads in your title and description tag. Step three, get more clicks. Let's break down each step in detail. First, you need to find Adwords ads for your target keyword or for related keywords. Why? Adwords advertisers spend thousands of dollars on advertising for one main goal. To get clicks. That means that Adwords ads that you see are often the result of hundreds if not thousands of split tests. In other words, when you see an Adwords ad in Google, you know that it's optimized to maximize clicks. In my case, I noticed that most of the Adwords ads for the keyword listbuilding used the words email list or email lists. I also noticed that these same Adwords ads used terms like build, grown and boost.

Organic traffic is what most marketers strive to increase. This traffic is defined as visitors coming from a search engine, such as Google or Bing. One thing to note is that paid search ads are not counted in this category. In blogkeep and Google Analytics, paid search traffic or PPC is marked in a separate category. Organic search traffic is labeled in green on the sources graph in Blogkeep and can give additional data into the actual search phrase that brought in your traffic. When looking at your analytics tool, you may see traffic labeled as “unknown” or “SSL”. This means that the search terms are being withheld from the data set. This is a result of Google not sharing this information, rather than the analytics platform you are using.

The term “organic traffic” is used for referring to the visitors that land on your website as a result of unpaid (“organic”) search results. Organic traffic is the opposite of paid traffic, which defines the visits generated by paid ads. Visitors who are considered organic find your website after using a search engine like Google or Bing, so they are not “referred” by any other website.

Why Is Organic Traffic Important

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